A Theology of the Spirit in the Former Prophets: A Pentecostal Perspective — PhD Thesis

I recently learned (thanks Daniel Isgrigg) that my PhD thesis “A Theology of the Spirit in the Former Prophets: A Pentecostal Perspective” is available free online through my doctoral alma mater: Bangor University, Wales. For those interested it can be read in whole HERE. An edited version of this work is due to be published within the year (under the same title) by CPT Press.

The following is the abstract:

This thesis works toward a constructive Pentecostal theology of the Spirit in the Former Prophets. Chapter one provides a history of interpretation (from 1896 to present) of major works engaging the Former Prophets with regard to the Spirit. Chapter two offers a Pentecostal hermeneutic of the Former Prophets. Chapter three provides a history of effects (or Wirkungsgeschichte) approach by hearing the Spirit texts of the Former Prophets alongside of early North American Pentecostals (specifically the journals from 1906-1920) in order to offer a better orientation to how Pentecostal communities have interpreted these texts in their formative years. Chapters four through seven apply the hermeneutic of chapter two to the groupings of texts of the Spirit in the Former Prophets. As such, the chapters that follow are larger literary units which include multiple references to the Spirit of Yahweh/God, but are grouped together as narratological units. Chapter four addresses the judges who explicitly experience the liberating Spirit of Yahweh. Chapter five addresses Saul and David’s musical and prophetic experiences of the Spirit of Yahweh/God both for good and ill. Chapter six addresses the ambiguities of the Spirit in the context of the prophet Micaiah. Chapter seven addresses the passing of the Spirit of true prophetic sonship from Elijah to Elisha. Chapter eight then attempts a constructive Pentecostal theology of the Spirit in light of the study of the Spirit in the Former Prophets laid out in the preceding exegetical chapters and the Wirkungsgeschichte of chapter three. Finally, the concluding chapter briefly summarizes the contributions of this study and entertains multiple potential directions for future study brought to light through this study.

New Classes and Why I Love My Job

I love my jobExcited about a few courses I’ve designed being added to the catalog (Lord willing):
BIBL 336 The Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, 1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings) – 3 credits
Students will analyze the accounts of Israel’s story as recorded in the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings, and an evaluation of various attempts to harmonize that story with other historical evidence.  Literary, textual and theological issues as well as an examination of archaeological evidence, social institutions, and ideology will provide the data for discussing the ideas contained in the Former Prophets and their role as scripture for the Church. Prerequisites: BIBL 151 and BIBL 253
BIBL 437 Apocalyptic Literature and the Revelation – 2 credits
Students will analyze apocalyptic texts of the second Temple period with particular emphasis given to the historical, literary and theological elements of the Revelation and its role as scripture for the Church. Prerequisites: BIBL 151 and BIBL 253
BIBL 337 Daniel and Ezekiel – 2 credits
Students will analyze the historical, literary and theological elements of the books of Daniel and Ezekiel and their role as scripture for the Church. Prerequisites: BIBL 151 and BIBL 253
LANG 437 Biblical Hebrew 2a – 3 credits
This course provides intermediate grammatical study, vocabulary building and discourse analysis of Biblical Hebrew narrative. Students build their vocabulary and translate selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament with particular attention to the book of Ruth. Prerequisites: LANG 435, LANG 436
LANG 438 Biblical Hebrew 2b – 3 credits
The genre of Hebrew Poetry will be explored, focusing on selections from the Psalms, the prophets, and wisdom literature. Students will develop recognition of the characteristics of this genre, with the outcome of becoming better readers of Hebrew Poetry. Students will develop skills to exegete, preach, and teach the portions of the Old Testament which are poetic. Prerequisites: LANG 437
As if I didn’t love studying the Hebrew Bible enough, I must say I’ve thoroughly enjoyed teaching Biblical Hebrew (1a & 1b) last year and being halfway through 2a this semester. I look forward to teaching Biblical Hebrew 2b (who doesn’t love Biblical Hebrew poetry???), Apocalyptic Literature and the Revelation (a topic I have taught numerous times as a pastor), as well as The Former Prophets (my actual specialization) next semester.
The beauty of teaching these courses lays in the fact that most students find this material fresh. Even those who previously thought they understood these books and topics, suddenly encounter the excitement of the new and enter the adventure of engaging Scriptures in ways they had not previously imagined. All I know is #ilovemyjob

Worship, the Arts, and the Spirit

David Plays the Harp for Saul by RembrandtI just submitted my proposal for the Society for Pentecostal Studies 2016 meeting in San Dimas, California (most excellent, dudes!) which is broadly themed “Worship, the Arts, and the Spirit”.
I am hoping my proposal gets accepted as in most previous years. I’ve titled my paper (which will end up as a part of my PhD thesis) “When Prophets Play the Lyre: Saul and the Strings of the Spirit”.
Here is my summary that I submitted (which is always fun to write when NONE of the paper has been written yet 🙂 ):

A recurring notion in 1 Samuel (chapters 10, 16, 18-19) appears to highlight the relation of King Saul to the Spirit, prophesying and the playing of the lyre. Saul initially receives the Spirit of the LORD and begins to prophesy as predicted by Samuel once Saul hears the music of the prophets at Gibeah. Later, the Spirit of the LORD departs from Saul and comes upon David. With the departure of the Spirit of the LORD a “troubling spirit of God” comes upon Saul causing sudden violent outbreaks. The only relief from the troubling spirit is the music of Spirit-endowed David on the lyre. Further, the “prophets prophesying” appears to function musically throughout this literary unit including with the overcoming of Saul twice to “prophesy” when encountering a group of prophets prophesying (in the first instance explicitly with music and suggestive in the second). A literary and theological interpretation of the relevant texts is offered for discerning the role of the Spirit in the instrumentation of the prophets in 1 Samuel with several proposed implications for Pentecostal practice.